Saturday morning market.

The not-just-motor city, Eastern Market.

Posted at 11:53 am in iPhone |
 

43 responses to “Saturday morning market.”

  1. basset said on September 13, 2008 at 6:23 pm

    careful now, you know what happened the LAST time you put up a picture with a vegetable in it…

  2. Jeff (the mild-mannered one) said on September 13, 2008 at 7:07 pm

    Those look like herbs . . .

  3. basset said on September 13, 2008 at 7:21 pm

    just blew the pic up and looked at it… pretty good resolution for a phone picture too… but I think those green things right in front of the man holding the white bag might be tomatoes, or maybe peppers. same for the red and yellow objects in baskets on the other side of the woman bending over.

    or, as our local news would tease it, “Mysterious objects found on farmers’ market table! We’ll tell you what they are – right after this!”

    which just bugs the hell out of me. essentially what it says is “we know something you don’t – wait and we’ll tell you!”

    best tease I remember hearing on that particular station, I can remember word for word…

    “Stay tuned – our next block is action-packed!”

  4. Jeff (the mild-mannered one) said on September 13, 2008 at 8:11 pm

    In front of the white bag — the tops, pointing away from us, of bundled radishes and beets? But the little red and pink pots closest to Nancy’s camera look like thyme or marjoram starts.

    Last tomatoes from the neighborhood garden today on top of black bean burgers. The basil’s going as yellow as the soybeans in the fields outside of town.

  5. Dexter said on September 13, 2008 at 8:11 pm

    from last thread: it sounds like the rev was a real pain-o.

  6. Jeff (the mild-mannered one) said on September 13, 2008 at 8:12 pm

    [Channeling Brian] Beets? Jeff, i’m calling bulls*** on that one! [/end Brian]

  7. Bill said on September 13, 2008 at 10:28 pm

    We’ve moved out outside basil to inside.
    Wish us luck.

  8. brian stouder said on September 13, 2008 at 11:07 pm

    Hahahahahaha!!!

    No no no; when you harvest the beets, you wash off the bulls***!

    As for photographic analysis, I know bupkis about produce, but I did note that the pavement looks rain-slicked; and indeed, D-town and our whole region seems to have a steady flow of rain spiraling up to us from Ike – which is a very pleasant thing. I water and water and water our flowers, and add some plant food every 10 days or so – but nothing makes them happier (or more lush and beautiful) than a good soaking rain.

    We’re going to have a beautiful autumn

  9. Jeff (the mild-mannered one) said on September 13, 2008 at 11:31 pm

    This would explain the trots i keep getting when i buy farmer’s market beets. Brian, what about mushrooms?

    I had some wonderful radishes at our AmeriCorps reception that were grown locally, but no one could give me tips on how to grow the durn things without ending up with half-rotted, half-lignified artifacts. Suggestions, anyone?

    I’ll bet i need more bovine end product in the garden, don’t i.

  10. brian stouder said on September 13, 2008 at 11:42 pm

    I’ll bet i need more bovine end product in the garden, don’t i.

    took the words right outa my mouth!

    I bet our daughter’s bunny would make short work of your ‘half-rotted, half-lignified artifacts’!

  11. caliban said on September 14, 2008 at 2:37 am

    Americans are just so stupid there isn’t any hope. The abject calumny directed at Kerry, well you would have thought nobody could be that fucking stupid. How many times can we hear that . How do we beat the bitch? Does somebody actualy believe getting your ass shot down makes you a hero?

    Here’s the deal. Kerry was a war hero. Neither McCain nor Poppy was a war hero. Fact, Jack. You can make shit up until the cows come home. But, Kerry pulled the guy out of the Mekong, W lit up another. Whatever.

  12. Jeff (the mild-mannered one) said on September 14, 2008 at 7:19 am

    I think anyone who takes off or lands on a carrier is a hero, flying an EA-6B Prowler or a A-4E Skyhawk or a F/A-18 Hornet or even a C-2A Greyhound. They reduce our need to have overseas land bases and provide meaningful deterrent, while offering speedy assistance to emergency situations around the world — all made possible by men and women willing to learn and practice the frightening skill of landing aircraft on a heaving card table.

    So from Poppy to the newest trainees off the coast, they’re heroes in my book, justly alongside of John Kerry. “In some ways aircraft carrier landings are a zen experience. For the fifteen to twenty seconds you are on final approach, there are only three things in the entire universe you care about: Meatball, lineup, and angle-of-attack. Everything else fades into irrelevance. It’s a very simple existence.”

    http://everything2.com/node/1383520

    Read down to the last line.

  13. Danny said on September 14, 2008 at 10:44 am

    Great read, Jeff. I loved the following line too:

    At the moment of touchdown, you do another thing that’s a bit counter-intuitive when you first learn of it: You JAM FULL THROTTLE!

    A bit counter-intuitive….indeed.

  14. basset said on September 14, 2008 at 10:51 am

    Caliban… STFU. And go away. If this were the nice civil bar discussion we sometimes like to pretend we’re having I would pitch your obnoxious ass onto the sidewalk myself.

    Jeff, as much as the thought of McCain being President scares me, I have to agree with you on the flying part… a night carrier landing is supposed to be the toughest feat a pilot can perform.

    on the other hand, I had a conversation with an airline-pilot friend once which went something like this…

    “Well, W did fly high-performance jet airplanes, you have to be reasonably intelligent for that, right?”

    “You’d be surprised.”

  15. basset said on September 14, 2008 at 11:01 am

    That was indeed a good read… anyone see the PBS series “Carrier”? It’s out on DVD now and really interesting, anything that’ll get me in front of the TV five nights in a row has to be something special.

    And think about what carrier landings were like back in WWII and Korea, with rudimentary landing lights or none at all and a guy with two colored paddles in his hands standing at the end of the deck directing the pilot in…

  16. Danny said on September 14, 2008 at 11:01 am

    basset, did you see that Yes is going to tour with an “understudy” singer that they found on youtube. His resume is he plays in several Canadian Yes tribute bands. Though, he is quite good.

  17. basset said on September 14, 2008 at 11:04 am

    didn’t see that… will go look at Yesworld. I wouldn’t think it could be Yes without Jon, though, no matter how many records they sold when that other guy was in there.

    King Crimson was in town a few weeks ago playing a 400-seat theater… I lost interest in them about 1985 but if it was the “Red” lineup I definitely woulda been there.

  18. Danny said on September 14, 2008 at 11:24 am

    Jon is quite sick. They had to postpone the tour and I think they are doing this for contractual obligations.

  19. basset said on September 14, 2008 at 11:39 am

    saw that… went straight to Amazon and signed up for RW’s new book too.

  20. James said on September 14, 2008 at 11:45 am

    I agree with caliban in principle, but think he’s needlessly potty-mouthed and inflammatory.

    Here’s what I know. McCain crashed 5 jets, and rained death from above.

    Brave to fly jets? Yeah… Heroic? Depends what you do with the jets. Shoot up villages? Not so heroic. Target civilians? Not so heroic. Kill the enemy under fire? Heroic. Save lives? Heroic.

    So who knows what McCain did before his imprisonment? What missions did he fly? Anyone? Anyone? Bueller?

  21. coozledad said on September 14, 2008 at 12:21 pm

    James: You are repeating unsubstantiated rumors about America’s Ace. He didn’t crash five planes, he only crashed four and caused substantial damage to a fifth.
    And speaking of damage to a fifth-who in the McCain/Palin transition team is in charge of locating oxy for Track, and overseeing the construction of the White House meth lab?
    I think one operative might be able to compartmentalize those duties, if they can manage to find one who’s not using.

  22. Danny said on September 14, 2008 at 12:40 pm

    basset (and probably Kirk would be interested too):

    Here is the youtube link to the singer understudy. I think you will agree he is quite good.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c3BFuxBayxg

    EDIT:
    I’m actually a little interested in this tour. Chris Squire hinted that they will be doing some material from the Drama album. Though it wasn’t Jon then, I think that album holds up very well and I tended to like it. Especially Machine Messiah. Very rocking track.

  23. Jeff (the mild-mannered one) said on September 14, 2008 at 1:42 pm

    “You’d be surprised.”

    It’s amazing how many things are like that — reflex capacity and development vs. cognition. The trick is keeping both around, but knowing which dog to kick and which to let sleep.

    BTW, in no way do i think the skill of carrier landing translates directly to civic leadership. Coming back from being broken under torture (the signed “confession”) and sustaining your own hope and that of broken men around you for years with strategic resistance and carefully planned co-ordination — that would go on the list, not the fighter jock stuff (and no, he didn’t fly a fighter anyhow).

    Sorry to hear Jon is unwell; what’s up with that?

  24. basset said on September 14, 2008 at 2:22 pm

    Yesworld.com says he has asthma and respiratory problems. I never cared much for “Drama” myself… but I’d travel a considerable distance to see them do “Awaken,” or “Gates of Delirium,” or “Close to the Edge.” the 90125 lineup played literally across the street from my office once and I didn’t go.

    that’s a good link, Danny, and so is the one right next to it on the same page… of Patrick Moraz butchering the organ solo from “Close to the Edge.”

    since I’ve already mentioned it twice, one more “COTE” reference, scroll down the page:
    http://www.timjacobs.com/america_fireman_tribute.htm

    McCain… you can apply whatever adjectives you want, I wouldn’t necessarily go with “heroic” for his flying ability but it’s not just anyone who can do a carrier landing. how many planes he tore up and whether he had anything to do with causing the fire on the Forrestal is a whole different situation.

  25. Joe Kobiela said on September 14, 2008 at 2:33 pm

    I,ll weigh in on the pilot part,
    Night carrier landings are the hardest part of military flying. Pilots blood pressure and heart beats are higher then than during combat. I would love to be able to due one.
    As far as McCain wrecking airplanes, unless you were with him and can prove pilot error, stay quiet. Also as I mentioned before, McCain was not a hero for flying in Nam, nor was he a hero for getting shot down, he was a hero for what he did and how he acted as a POW. I could only hope to be that brave.
    Nuff said.
    Joe

  26. Danny said on September 14, 2008 at 2:34 pm

    Very cool link, basset. I have seen that ladder truck before. Shortly after 9/11, they had some links (I believe from Yesworld).

  27. Danny said on September 14, 2008 at 2:37 pm

    …he was a hero for what he did and how he acted as a POW.

    So true, Joe.

  28. coozledad said on September 14, 2008 at 2:46 pm

    William P. Lawrence was ranking commander while he and McCain were imprisoned.
    McCain has left whatever he was behind. He’s just another Rovian, out to enrich himself. The Keating five stuff also appears to run in the family; but at least sonny knows when to exit that burning building:
    http://www.lvrj.com/news/25958074.html
    Sorry: Adopted son. Nothing whatsoever to do with McCain. Nothing at all.

  29. Jeff (the mild-mannered one) said on September 14, 2008 at 3:59 pm

    OK, back from season-opening Cub Scout hike, and i’m calling on the power of the internets — here in the Midwest, a plant that just popped, topped, and blossomed over the last couple weeks, mainly along forest edges, about two foot tall with green serrated leaves wider at the base, tapering to a point, with clumps of very small white blossoms that aren’t even really blossoms. I’d been watching them come out for weeks along roads and treelines, and thought they were some kind of aster popping early with the particular weather pattern of this year, but asters they ain’t. No center, let alone yellow, but flat clusters of little sousaphones of white — almost like a Queen Anne’s Lace. (I kept asking other leaders on the hike, and they either said “I figured you’d know” or “Isn’t that Queen Anne’s/Wild Carrot?”)

    So if anyone sees these white wildflower herbaceous thingys in their neighborhood and knows what they are, please tell me. Can’t find a Google-set of descriptors that has gotten me even a hint, but lots of links to aster pictures!

    (They aren’t asters, this much i know.)

  30. basset said on September 14, 2008 at 4:22 pm

    “green serrated leaves” and white blossoms? you sure that’s not ditchweed?

  31. Jeff (the mild-mannered one) said on September 14, 2008 at 5:01 pm

    Leaves wider at the bottom, kind of an ace of spades outline with jagged borders. Not in clusters of seven leaflets, either! (I guess i didn’t know ditchweed had blossoms, but i’m guessing cultivators don’t want to let it get to that stage often.)

  32. beb said on September 14, 2008 at 5:44 pm

    This is the non-politcs thread, people. Focus!

    It’s not only been drizzling these last couple days in Detroit it’s been warm and muggy. I was going to take the A/C out of the windows this weekend, but ended up needing them to keep the house bearable.

  33. Suzi said on September 14, 2008 at 6:08 pm

    “Caliban… STFU.”

    Jesus, that was offensive.

    I agree with you, caliban.

  34. del said on September 14, 2008 at 8:08 pm

    Sarah Palin. NYT article:
    http://www.nytimes.com/2008/09/14/us/politics/14palin.html?_r=1&em&oref=slogin

  35. Jeff (the mild-mannered one) said on September 14, 2008 at 9:44 pm

    Ahhhhhhh . . . we’ve lost David Foster Wallace — http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/books/AP-Obit-Wallace.html

    There was much more we needed to hear from him; check out his commencement address from Kenyon College (hello, Dorothy) to see what i mean — http://www.marginalia.org/dfw_kenyon_commencement.html

    My editor where the biggest hunk of my freelancing is done was always handing us Pomona College magazine articles, often by Wallace, saying, “Go ahead, write that way.” And i would think “As if.”

    I lost a clergy friend this exact way a few years ago, his wife running a quick errand with no foreboding at all, and returning to find . . . i don’t really ever want to understand this choice, exactly. But still we try.

  36. brian stouder said on September 14, 2008 at 10:21 pm

    i don’t really ever want to understand this choice

    I think this sort of thing is like the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle (wherein you can know the position of a particle, or the velocity of a particle, but you cannot know both).

    Irrational acts, by definition, cannot be understood. To be honest, stories like that one always anger me, a little.

  37. basset said on September 14, 2008 at 10:53 pm

    “…that was offensive.”

    well, sometimes that’s what it takes. maybe it’ll work.

    don’t know if I agree with Caliban or not, I have long since given up trying to understand what he’s saying.

  38. moe99 said on September 15, 2008 at 12:07 am

    Well, I get to go Jeff one better and mention that I am back from my weekend church retreat (Presbyterian, thank you very much). We spent it talking about our experiences at camps, conferences and retreats and I was reminded of my time as a camperoonie at Camp Palmer in Defiance (where the late Terry Ryan of The Prize Winner of Defiance, Ohio was my counselor), Camp Libbey from the Toledo Council of Girl Scouts (my dad was the camp pediatrician since they were physically located in Defiance County somewhere); and Camp Ladyglen in Grand Rapids, OH. And we sang a number of camp songs such as Little Bunny FrouFrou, the Johnny Appleseed song before dinner, and the canoeing song (“My paddle’s clean and bright, flashing in water…”). Any other suggestions for a sing a long?

  39. Danny said on September 15, 2008 at 12:39 am

    99 Bottles of … oh .. nevermind.

    Also, avoid limericks with “Nantucket” in them…

  40. Dexter said on September 15, 2008 at 2:50 am

    Shady’s back
    He’s back in town

    (Well, he never left, he’s been holed up in his Day-Twah mansion.)

    Now he’s back with KING MATHERS.

    http://www.nypost.com/seven/09142008/entertainment/music/shady_in_waiting_129067.htm

  41. Jeff (the mild-mannered one) said on September 15, 2008 at 7:04 am

    The German Orchestra? The Bubblegum Song? The Ants Go Marching (not to be confused with Dave Matthews’ version) has been very apropos recently, thanks to Ike — gadzooks, i just see on TV that they’ve canceled school all over central Ohio today, due to tree branches everywhere and spotty power outages. I should gather a bunch of our Cubs to march down the sidewalks, sing “Ging Gang Goolie” and pick up tree litter while the village runs the chipper down the middle of the street.

  42. Suzi said on September 15, 2008 at 8:11 am

    “…that was offensive.”

    well, sometimes that’s what it takes. maybe it’ll work.

    “Shut up!” was an expletive at our house when I was a kid.

  43. brian stouder said on September 15, 2008 at 8:30 am

    Well, Nance’s Monday offering may well be titled ‘Monday morning market’, featuring ex-Lehman people selling fruit on the street