Saturday morning market.

I’m moving to Coozledad’s vegetarian farm.

Posted at 11:55 am in Detroit life |
 

48 responses to “Saturday morning market.”

  1. brian stouder said on February 6, 2010 at 12:21 pm

    Hey! – the Fox News pig heads are at the market?

    Excellent

  2. coozledad said on February 6, 2010 at 1:15 pm

    There’s some Italian (ancient Roman) dish that’s made with pork cheeks, linguine, tomatoes and Pecorino Romano. Seems like it starts with a B.(Edit- bucatini all’amatriciana.)
    There’s a house across the street from us that’ll probably be on the market fairly soon, on sixty acres (a lot of it wooded). The elderly woman who lived there is too frail to be out there by herself anymore. The house is right cute, but it’s gonna need a whole lot of work. A portion of it is the original 1830’s? structure.
    We’ll pay you for access to the well!

  3. Rana said on February 6, 2010 at 2:19 pm

    It’s the eyes drawn on the pig’s head’s wrapping that makes the picture. Goodness.

  4. alex said on February 6, 2010 at 3:56 pm

    What the devil is that in the top picture? Looks like a bird with a walrus head and its left eye socket stuffed with a cotton ball. My middle-aged eyes can’t see shit on this little laptop anymore.

  5. Dexter said on February 6, 2010 at 4:00 pm

    This is Noah Cross. Quiz: How did he prefer to have fish served?
    http://www.memphismagazine.com/binary/ce27/point_counterpoint2.jpg

    NOAH CROSS
    Uh-huh — oh I hope you don’t
    mind. I believe they should be
    served with the head.

    Jake Gittes glances down at the fish whose isinglass eye
    is glazed over with the heat of cooking.

    GITTES
    — Fine, as long as you don’t
    serve chicken that way.

    CROSS
    (laughs)

  6. Jolene said on February 6, 2010 at 5:01 pm

    It’s a sheep, Alex. What looks like a cotton ball to you is its ear.

  7. nancy said on February 6, 2010 at 5:45 pm

    It’s actually a wee lamb. The guy always brings livestock, usually chickens, ducks, turkeys and a few rabbits, but today he brought all of the above plus two very unhappy lambs and even a small pig. I love pork but pigs are as intelligent as dogs and it’s hard to see them on the hoof waiting for their doom. (Although God knows who would buy a live pig in the heart of the city like that. Where are you going to slaughter it? Your back yard?) I wanted to liberate the whole truckload to Belle Isle.

  8. Dexter said on February 6, 2010 at 6:07 pm

    My old blogger guru Craig Crawford emailed this to me just now…he lives in D.C.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C3fmMhOeRgw&feature=player_embedded

  9. MichaelG said on February 6, 2010 at 6:29 pm

    Pork jowl is often cured and made into a type of bacon called guanciale. It’s excellent – tastes pretty much like regular bacon.

  10. Connie said on February 6, 2010 at 9:25 pm

    Dutch grandmas make balkenbrij from pig’s heads and it was always the most disgusting smelling thing I ever was around as a kid. A lot like head cheese I suspect.

  11. brian stouder said on February 6, 2010 at 11:32 pm

    Speaking of that, I watched the Big Cheese of the Tea Party movement regale her Nashville crowd – and it was genuinely funny stuff. (the Q & A afterwards was ok, but her speech was so laughable and silly that it’s almost tempting to think that she’s AIMING to emulate Tina Fey)

    She-Who seemed to have lost her place a time or three (those teleprompters ain’t so easy to use afterall!), and was comically incoherent another several times (she mistakenly upheld Alaska instead of America as the hope of the world, for one example).

    If that person is elected president, one would have to view our choice as a fit of willful, self-destructive ignorance; a sort of national Jim Jones moment, but with vats full of know-nothing tea bags instead of Kool Aid.

    Aside from political head cheese, today Pam and I went and saw “Dear John” at the movies. I had no idea what the movie was going to be, except that Pam had read the book…..and when we walked into the theater for the matinee, there was maybe 200 people in there – with maybe 5 or 6 males in the whole place….which was Clue One for me!

    But let me just say – I thought it was a fine movie; more than a little powerful. I really, really like Amanda Seyfried (she’s the reason to watch Mamma Mia) – but the assembled women seemed to enjoy seeing Channing Tatum.

    Aside from the eye-pleasing cast, I thought the movie had something to say, and it said it in a memorable way.

  12. brian stouder said on February 7, 2010 at 12:26 am

    I finally read the article about the Kalamazoo woman who collects all the Playboy magazines, and this passage struck me as pretty funny (with emphasis added):

    Through the mailing list — which its members call the PML for short — she met Mark Tomlonson, who, oddly enough, was also from Kalamazoo. Tomlonson began reviewing centerfolds on the list in an “attempt to recall the impact certain outstanding centerfolds had had on me when I first saw them,” he explains in an e-mail. Eventually he took on all of them, churning out a 200-word review on each Playmate’s birthday over the course of 18 months: “In my personal life, several things were taking a turn for the worse. . . .” he writes. The reviews “provided structure in my life at a time when the old structures seemed shaky.”

    Tom Snyder on NBC’s old Tomorrow show once forthrightly stated that the mission of Playboy (et al) was to facilitate masturbation – and this guy’s “churned out reviews” and “shakey structures” brought that right back

  13. Jolene said on February 7, 2010 at 1:37 pm

    Check out this too-funny picture of the cheat sheet Sarah Palin used during the Q&A part of last night’s speech. Hard to believe that someone could be both such an idiot and such a powerful force.

  14. mark said on February 7, 2010 at 2:19 pm

    In what world would that be considered a cheat sheet? As someone who has spoken extemporaneously before crowds of varying sizes, a few words written down to remind of points of intended emphasis is hardly uncommon.

    Hard to believe how many people waste a portion of each day checking up on and posting about Palin. Too bad you can’t charge rent for all the space she leases in your heads.

    I’ll bet she isn’t even bright enough to be a Navy “Corpseman”.

  15. Joe Kobiela said on February 7, 2010 at 2:34 pm

    Thanks Mark you made my day. You summed up my thoughts exactly. I bet most people on this board probley don’t understand the “corpsman” referance, but I bet they would if W or Dan Quail or any other connservitive said it.
    Pilot Joe

  16. crinoidgirl said on February 7, 2010 at 2:43 pm

    Jolene, that is a hoot and a half. Confirms her level of intelligence and sincerity, for me at least. Like the guy said, it’s not like she’s taking a math exam and she can’t remember a quadratic equation.

  17. Dexter said on February 7, 2010 at 2:56 pm

    Army medic , Vietnam veteran Dexter weighing in. It actually hurt a little bit to hear my Commander in Chief refer to “corpse-men”. Language is an art, as we all remember Reagan saying “Guv-munt” and Bush43 with the “nuke-lrr” thing, and Jimmy Carter’s right-hand man could not even pronounce his own name. That would be the late Hamilton Jordan, pronounced “jurr-dunn”.
    But geez…Obama is a damn law professor, he’s smart…and “corpse-man” ?!?
    A corpsman is usually a Navy medic, and mostly used to signify a medic assigned as a first-response technician to an injury in a field operation. We were the same, it’s just that the Navy and U.S. Marines used the corpsman designation and we responded to “medic”. We were all called “Doc”, however.

  18. alex said on February 7, 2010 at 2:59 pm

    I read that She Who Cannot Be Named trotted out the old Obama TelePrompTer chestnut—and faltered numerous times reading from the one directly in front of her face. This morning on Fox News she went through fantastical contortions to defend Rush Limbaugh for dissing Democrats as ‘tards while still calling for Rahm Emanuel’s head.

    Only the most rabid of partisans could forgive this twit for being such a dipshit. She’s just the president they deserve. I say we hold a national referendum on removing them all to Alaska and making them secede.

  19. moe99 said on February 7, 2010 at 3:48 pm

    Mark and Joe: If you back down on the teleprompter crap that was slung about Obama, I’ll not gloat that Palin needs to not only consult her palm pilot but have cheat notes written on her hand.

    http://www.oliverwillis.com/2010/02/06/sarah-palin-caught-reading-her-speech-off-her-hand/

    and Palin in her speech, where she was using her hand notes to crib, even criticized Obama for using a teleprompter!! Can one say “schadenfreude?”
    http://www.google.com/gwt/x?ei=6sZuS4iSJpGNoAeP7b3PDQ&u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.huffingtonpost.com/stefan-sirucek/did-palin-use-crib-notes_b_452458.html&wsc=gh&wsi=3bcf03d25ab3ea1e

    And I would bet there are many who do not know how to properly pronounce corpsman. If all you’ve done is read the word, not hear it used in daily parlance, it could be a trip up. How about colonel? adjutant? reveille? or in the legal profession: voir dire?

    I remember as a kid knowing lots of big words because I read a lot. But not knowing how to pronounce them. And making a number of gaffes as a result.

    I would bet that if Obama ever says the word ‘corpsman’ again, it will be pronounced correctly, If not, I will buy you each a latte when you next come to Seattle.

  20. Jeff Borden said on February 7, 2010 at 3:48 pm

    Mark and Joe,

    Doggone it, now, I’m just a hard-workin’ real American and I find Sarah Palin endlessly entertaining. Gee, I love watching her fleece the rubes who hang on her every one- syllable word almost as much as watching the grimaces from real Republicans who now understand just what sad, ol’ John McCain loosed upon our land.

    In a Republican Party dominated by soulless, joyless, gray drips like John Boehner, Eric Cantor and Mitch McConnell, she is a peacock among pigeons. Why would I not want to watch her? She’s “Real Housewives of Orange County,” “Jersey Shore” and “Intervention” wrapped into one delectable media goodie.

  21. coozledad said on February 7, 2010 at 3:51 pm

    I’d like to charge rent for the space she occupies in the media. for a victim she certainly spends an inordinate amount of time wallowing in front of a fucking camera. There have to be a couple of Republicans somewhere that will acknowledge that it was a mistake to position someone whose intellectual and emotional development plateaued their senior year in high school as a candidate for high office. Sarah’s behaviors are more consistent with a kind of mild autism than with the core talents necessary to become a moderately successful politician.
    In choosing her, McCain and his folks also laid waste to the idea that he’s ever been anything but a simpering company man, no matter how attractive that bogus Milbank narrative seemed. The more accurate narrative for McCain, and by extension, the Republicans, is a story of entitled underachievers who have too far to fall before they’re compelled to enter a twelve step program. In the meantime, they’re gambling people’s careers and livelihoods away- people on their own fucking side- people who have significantly more talent and ability, more guts,and infinitely more character.
    I think it’s a result of reaching back to that vacuous leathery puppet, Reagan, for everything from ideological perspective to how to make their candidates seem more human. I’m glad I’m not a gambler: twenty years ago I would have bet Elvis was going to be the next trailer trash Jesus. At least he could sing.

  22. Jolene said on February 7, 2010 at 3:57 pm

    Of course, people use notes when they give talks, but, in this case, the method is amusing, and the content is embarrassing. Has Sarah Palin ever given a talk in which she did not mention energy? You’d think by this time it’d be second nature.

    Trust me, there are few things I’d rather do than forget the existence of Sarah Palin entirely. But she keeps popping up in the news, and a sizable number of people seem to want her to be president–an idea that I find both sickening and horrifying.

    And yes, it’s disappointing and, to me, surprising that Obama didn’t know how to pronounce corpsman, but, still, I’d bet on his level of general knowledge and ability to use the English language appropriately over Palin’s pretty much any day of the week.

  23. brian stouder said on February 7, 2010 at 6:30 pm

    Jolene, I’m not disappointed in the least. When it comes to the pronounciation of words, our 44th president is a clear improvement over our 43rd (yeah – I know – some of our more thin-skinned Republican friends HATE it when we compare our current president with our last one. But, really, too bad)

    And aside from that, his forthright actions speak louder than his words – or the yipping of the ankle-biters of the blogosphere or the rightwing flying monkeys of the airwaves

  24. Deggjr said on February 7, 2010 at 7:51 pm

    Extemporaneous speaking? Palin was paid $100,000 for the appearance with weeks or months of preparation time. Could it have her as much as 30 seconds to ‘prepare’?

    As the link said, remembering those particular talking points would be like trying to remember her birthdate (or if you prefer, her favorite color).

  25. LAMary said on February 7, 2010 at 8:28 pm

    Bucatini all’amatriciana is one of the best things in the world. I use pancetta becuase it’s hard to find guanciale in these parts.
    I was going to make lamb shanks for supper tonight but I couldn’t face going into the fancier grocery store to buy eight shanks. The line of overprice superbowl snack shoppers was very long. Instead we’re going to have red beans and rice in honor of N.O. Whether they win or not.

  26. MichaelG said on February 7, 2010 at 9:57 pm

    Saints win and Ashley smiles.

  27. LAMary said on February 7, 2010 at 9:57 pm

    Alright. They won one for Ashley.

  28. brian stouder said on February 7, 2010 at 10:27 pm

    I was going to be happy whoever won, and was only hoping for a good game; and it was a humdinger, wasn’t it?

    When the Saints’ coach went for an on-side kick to start the second half – and it worked! – the foreshadowing was unmistakeable.

    And seeing Drew Brees with his little son at the end was just flat-out good stuff

  29. MichaelG said on February 7, 2010 at 10:42 pm

    Mary, it’s also great in Carbonara. And I don’t think I’ve ever seen two posts with the same time stamp. Must have been a bittersweet moment for Archie Manning, who, by all accounts, is one of the true nice guys of the NFL.

  30. Dexter said on February 7, 2010 at 11:03 pm

    Fuck all the fucking fuckmooks who dissed Drew Brees ever since he went to Purdue. I loved it in the postgame, when he told how this current Saints team came together, a bunch of free agents, and the kind of free agents that nobody wanted.
    They banded together and kept improving, and now they are the crown wearers. “They” said Brees would never make it in the Big Ten Conference…too slow…and he starred. He was given little chance to make it in the pros, too little arm strength, way too short in height. This is even better for us that followed Brees and wished him the best. This is even better than bag-boy Kirk Warner’s Super Bowl win with St. Louis. Brees just would not believe all the negativity.
    Tom Brady is another case. He was not heralded at Michigan, he was back-up most of his career there, he barely made the taxi-squad with NE Patriots, and only got a chance because of injuries. And now Drew Brees joins Peyton Manning and Brady as the class of their era, or as Steve Young just called him, “elite”. Who dat? Drew Brees and the fabulous NOLA Saints!

  31. Joe Kobiela said on February 8, 2010 at 4:44 am

    I wonder if we can FINALLY quit hearing about poor New Orleans. I’m glad they won, but enough about katrina.
    Pilot Joe

  32. Dorothy said on February 8, 2010 at 8:53 am

    Why don’t you guys do what I do when She-Who comes on whatever channel I happen to be watching? Switch to another channel! Problem solved. I chose not to hear, speak or think about her – except, of course, when it comes to reading nn.c commentary.

    Due to the Big Storm this weekend I had time to sit and knit and chose to finally watch some CDs my sister gave me. Have any of you seen the BBC production of “Bleak House” from 2005? It’s mesmerizing stuff. I’ve seen 7 of the 15 or 16 episodes so far. A really outstanding story and wonderful actors.

  33. brian stouder said on February 8, 2010 at 9:02 am

    Dorothy – Pam loves that Emma thing on PBS, and we both enjoyed Dear John this past weekend (major, major chic flick – but that’s OK)

    I won­der if we can FINALLY quit hear­ing about poor New Orleans

    Is that the rule? – that once a sports franchise wins a championship, the rest of us are free to ignore anything bad that previously happened there, or thereabouts?

    So since the Red Sox finally won a World Series, we can skip all this horse shit about “tea parties” and so on, right? And indeed – the Yankees won in 2009, so no more of this endless talk about what happened there on September 11, 2001, right? We are free from worry about “Pre-9/11 thinking” – ’cause there’s nothing to learn from those events, or how we dealt with them – especially now that a professional sports franchise won a championship?

    Not singling out Joe for this; I’ve already heard this comment enough times this morning that I expect it will become a right wing meme before the sun goes down tonight – right along with the astounding and deeply significant fact that the president mis-pronounced the word corpsman.

  34. Jeff (the mild-mannered one) said on February 8, 2010 at 9:14 am

    Gotta love the Purdue QB at work last night — the Hoosier State was a winner however that game went, but the better team won. And on the eve of the 100th birthday of the Boy Scouts of America, how could not the team with a fleur-de-lis on their hats win?

    By the way, Palin didn’t use a teleprompter. Not that there’s anything wrong with that.

  35. brian stouder said on February 8, 2010 at 9:21 am

    Yes – because she knew her speech like the back of her hand!

  36. Jeff (the mild-mannered one) said on February 8, 2010 at 9:25 am

    It looked like it was in the palm of her hand, actually. The three word note, and the room as a whole.

  37. brian stouder said on February 8, 2010 at 9:33 am

    and the room as a whole.

    Indeed, and to answer Dorothy, this is why I tuned in to watch; I wanted to see for myself. And it was entertaining (for now). In that room she could do no wrong. Her speech was somewhat halting and she seemed to lose her place (or her train of thought, or whatever) several times, and she mis-spoke a time or two.

    But when it’s your beau ideal up there, all is forgiven, yes? I know that feeling (although I don’t have it for her)

    And, not for nothing, but that Nashville audience was as uniformly white as Joe Biden’s hair, from what crowd shots I could see.

    Just sayin’

  38. Jeff (the mild-mannered one) said on February 8, 2010 at 9:42 am

    Saying that there is racism among the Tea Party mob is as indicative as saying there are socialists among Obama supporters. I buy neither argument as meaningful. Are there more racists (avowed and unconsicous) among Tea Partiers than among Obama supporters? Doubtless. Are there more socialists among Obama’s adherents than in the Tea Party leadership? Unquestionably. Neither assertion really tells us anything.

    I would agree that the Tea Party movement, as publicly seen so far, seems to have Sarah Palin and Steve Forbes as their youthful, edgy outer bounds, and they look older and certainly whiter. That would tend to argue for a) some short term electoral gains, since grandma and grandpa vote more consistently than the grandkids, but b) doesn’t create a lasting basis, since grandpa and grandma die more consistently than the grandkids. Demographically, they don’t seem to have a ten year outlook that holds up.

    On the other hand, the grandkids, as they start looking at their paystubs and property tax tickets, will keep getting older. And a little disoriented at their gross/net percentages.

  39. John said on February 8, 2010 at 9:49 am

    Anyone else creeped out by the bleached whale peeking out from Pete Townshend’s shirt?

  40. jcburns said on February 8, 2010 at 9:52 am

    Y’know, Jeff TMMO, actual Socialism (as a political theory) is way way more benign and, well, people-promoting than any flavor of racism. (Yes, I know, conservatives like to sputter “Socialism” in a way that equates it with Stalinism, but y’know? It’s not. It’s kinda closer to Medicare. Which I like, and would like even more people to have.)

    I know you know that.

    And the ‘ism’ that involves claiming our President is dependent on teleprompters while writing notes—prompts! on her hand—is called hypocrisy…uh..ism.

    And don’t get me started on the US needing a commander in chief more than a law professor. So much for ‘nation of laws’, eh? New slogan: ‘nation of commanders.’

    Read Garry Wills about how the ‘Commander in Chief’ title has been distorted over the years into something quite imperial.

  41. brian stouder said on February 8, 2010 at 9:52 am

    I buy nei­ther argu­ment as mean­ing­ful.

    fair enough.

    Are there more social­ists among Obama’s adher­ents than in the Tea Party lead­er­ship? Unques­tion­ably

    I would question that one. Lots of angry teabaggers tote signs that say “Leave My Medi-Care Alone!!”; but I’d agree that angry racists on the one side are cancelled by angry socialists on the other, leaving folks like you and I to sort out the rest

  42. Jolene said on February 8, 2010 at 9:55 am

    Are you equating racism and socialism, Jeff, or putting them on some kind of dimension of political philosophy? Because I don’t think they work that way. Socialism is a political/economic philosophy; one may or may not find it compelling, but it’s a logical system w/ some claim to plausibility and morality. I suppose one could say that racism is a political/economic philosophy too, but I’d don’t think anyone advocating its plausibility or morality would get far.

  43. Jeff (the mild-mannered one) said on February 8, 2010 at 10:49 am

    I’m talking about gauging a movement’s core from outliers. Not gonna do it. Wouldn’t be prudent. And I dislike racism a bit more than socialism, but not as much as my brother Jeff would like. The fact that we have some social programs (some of which work quite well) does not equate to the desire to see a larger share of the industrial economy directly managed by the state and governmental elites. Saying “nyah, nyah, your mother gets Medicare!” doesn’t mean that socialism is fine or that I’m a hypocrite for disliking it because my parents use a state program.

    If single-payer Medicare For All would work, I’d be for it. I don’t think it will, at least not in a way that I’m less comfortable with than the current situation. Granting that the status quo is non-sustainable, I think we’ll end up seeing some form of Medicare For All/Medicare Part E and political disputes over end of life care, ending of life “care,” and abortion. Which we have already, so I’m philosophical. But Hamilton’s “report on manufactures” shows you can have a national industrial policy without state control of the means of production . . . or at least, that’s how I read it. Off to the slippery slopes of our fair county . . .

  44. jcburns said on February 8, 2010 at 10:54 am

    Um, again, Medicare is Socialism. And there are a lot of programs that come from Socialist theory that have made our country great (or kept it afloat) over the 200-plus years. Racism is not something to dislike ‘a bit more’—it’s something that, in its pure form, makes people evil. Fortunately, we only witness it in highly diluted form most days these days, but make no mistake, it leads (by definition) to humans hating their fellow humans. Evil.

  45. moe99 said on February 8, 2010 at 11:27 am

    Jeff tmmo, go read the book The Help and see if you think racism is just a smidge below socialism. I would think that someone with your background, would be fervently denouncing racism.

  46. Jeff (the mild-mannered one) said on February 8, 2010 at 1:42 pm

    Smidge would be your word, not mine. “A bit” may not be enough to satisfy you, but there’s enough space between them for me to distinguish them. Jeff, you keep asserting that Medicare *IS* socialism. It isn’t, it’s a government program, and I’m not opposed to all of them.

    And I don’t fervently denounce much of anything. Plenty of fervent denouncing and cursing of the darkness all around me, they don’t need my help.

  47. moe99 said on February 8, 2010 at 2:09 pm

    That’s really disappointing. I don’t see any good side to racism. Perhaps you could enlighten me.

  48. brian stouder said on February 8, 2010 at 3:16 pm

    you keep assert­ing that Medicare *IS* social­ism. It isn’t, it’s a gov­ern­ment pro­gram, and I’m not opposed to all of them.

    Allow me to LEAP to agree with the political sentiment expressed here, even as I suspect that those folks with Obama-as-Commie-Joker (Heath Ledger version) signs at the teabagger confabs would never, ever, ever accept that any ‘government program’ proposed by the Obama administration is anything less than unrefined socialism.

    But beware; every government program is a manifestation of “socialism” – if words have meaning; or else, there is no such thing as “socialism” at all