Saturday morning market.

Haven’t done one of these for a while. It seems the only caption that applies is: The glory of everything.

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Posted at 10:16 am in Detroit life, iPhone |
 

24 responses to “Saturday morning market.”

  1. Dexter said on September 14, 2013 at 11:41 am

    And we are off to Kapnick’s Orchards tomorrow.
    http://www.kapnickorchards.com/

  2. prospero said on September 14, 2013 at 12:55 pm

    Abundance. I love those yellow tomatoes for pasta sauce. Sweetness that doesn’t come from adding sugar, which I could never bring myself to do anyway. Especially when you roast them in olive oil first. And those eggplants look beautiful. Just-right size, before they get bitter and need a salt bath before making parmigianna. Freezes well in portions and makes amazing sandwiches on crusty bread. Nice photo.

  3. Julie Robinson said on September 14, 2013 at 1:31 pm

    A friend who has acid problems says the yellow tomatoes are much lower in acid and she can tolerate them. We had yellow pear tomatoes last year that were a big larger than cherry tomatoes and they had great flavor. Me, I just had a BLT and two ears of sweet corn for lunch. Our daughter is making us something called beet spaghetti for dinner; I don’t know how she makes it but we had to find beets with the tops still on. Should be interesting. The glory of everything indeed!

  4. LAMary said on September 14, 2013 at 2:39 pm

    I made this the other night. You can substitute burata cheese for the avocado.

    Avocado Toasts with Heirloom Tomatoes and Herbs

    YIELD

    2 servings (plus leftover tomato salad)

    TIME

    Prep: 45 minutes

    Cook: 5 minutes

    Total: 50 minutes

    INGREDIENTS

    Red onion, ¼ medium (thinly sliced)

    Red wine vinegar, ½ cup

    Ripe heirloom tomatoes, 2 medium (cored and cut into bite-size pieces)

    Cherry or grape tomatoes, ¾ cup (preferably Sungold tomatoes; halved)

    Mixed herbs (such as basil, cilantro and mint), 1 cup (roughly torn)

    Sea salt, 1 teaspoon, plus extra for serving

    Extra-virgin olive oil, ½ cup plus 2 tablespoons

    Good quality day-old bread, 2 thick slices

    Garlic clove, 1 (peeled and halved)

    Ripe Hass avocado, ½ (pitted, quartered lengthwise and peeled)

    Persian cucumber, 1 (peeled and sliced into ¼-inch rounds)

    Freshly ground black pepper

    Crème fraîche (or yogurt), 2 tablespoons (optional)

    DIRECTIONS

    1. To a small bowl, add the:
    •Sliced red onion
    •Red wine vinegar

    Set aside to macerate for 5 minutes

    2. To a medium bowl, add the:
    •Chopped heirloom tomatoes
    •Halved cherry tomatoes
    •Torn herbs
    •1 teaspoon of the sea salt
    •½ cup of the extra-virgin olive oil
    •Macerated red onion plus 2 tablespoons of the red wine vinegar macerating liquid

    Stir to combine and set aside to marinate for 15 minutes.

    3. Into a toaster, add the:
    •Bread slices

    Once they are golden-brown, use a pastry brush to lightly coat the bread with the:
    •Remaining 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

    Then rub with the:
    •Halved garlic clove

    On each piece of toast, place an:
    •Avocado quarter

    Use a fork to smash the avocado onto the toast. Season with a:
    •Pinch of sea salt

    Place the toasts onto the plates.

    4. To the bowl with the tomato mixture, add the:
    •Sliced cucumber

    Stir to combine, then spoon some of the tomato salad over each toast. Sprinkle with the:
    •Freshly ground black pepper
    •Drizzle with the:Crème fraîche or yogurt, if using

    Serve.

  5. Deborah said on September 14, 2013 at 2:56 pm

    We just got back from the Santa Fe Farmers Market, in the pouring rain. Surprisingly lots of people there. It’s been raining a lot, as was predicted. I’m not complaining one bit, this is supposed to keep up until Weds. We got peppers, tomatoes, fingerling potatos and a marigold strand. They have the market at the Railyard on Saturdays and Tuesdays.

  6. Deborah said on September 14, 2013 at 3:01 pm

    LA Mary that recipe sounds very good. We have nearly all the ingredients except cucumber. Hmmmm.

  7. prospero said on September 14, 2013 at 3:12 pm

    I can’t stand Alabama football. They pay players and the coach is a sanctimonius phony for publiic consumption, all the while they are cheating. But Johnny Manziel is so obnoxious, all I can say this pm is Roll Tide!!!

    Deborah Zucchini is a perfect substitute for cucumber in almost anything. Frequently, the lower liquid content makes things better, as in gazpacho.

  8. MichaelG said on September 14, 2013 at 3:26 pm

    Yeah, that Alabama/A&M game is one of those I wish both could lose.

    Boy, did Michigan sneak by.

  9. LAMary said on September 14, 2013 at 4:14 pm

    prospero, if you don’t have yellow tomatoes consider adding grated carrot to tomato sauce for sweetness. You can sauté it with the onions, celery, garlic (if you make your sauce that way) before adding the tomatoes and it not only adds sweetness, it takes away some of the acidity in my opinion.

  10. Deborah said on September 14, 2013 at 5:30 pm

    It’s downright cool here in Santa Fe so we made a big pot of chili today. And that’s the kind with meat, tomatoes, beans etc garnished with chopped spring onions, shredded cheddar, cilantro and sour cream. The first time I got chili at a Whole Foods in NM it was basically green chili sauce, I don’t know what they call what we call chili? We’ve had a couple of fires in our fireplace the last few evenings too. I love fall, can’t wait for the aspens to turn, and then the cottonwoods. Glorious. Still a ways off but it’s in the air.

    A couple of days ago we braised a pork butt and had pulled pork sandwiches for a few days, holy cow that was good eating.

    We have an upcoming project for our place in Santa Fe, renovating the depressing bathroom. It involves a trip to Ikea though and the closest one is in Tempe, AZ a 437 mile drive. But a beautiful drive so we’re moving ahead with the planning. Our landlady is thrilled with our design and has approved everything. I’m looking forward to the demolishing and the building since my Beaver Brook experience. Only problem is the forecast high temperature in Tempe for the time we’ve designated to be there will be 107. Ouch.

  11. Jeff (the mild-mannered one) said on September 14, 2013 at 6:51 pm

    Gotta put grated carrot in the marinara. Just don’t tell anyone.

  12. prospero said on September 14, 2013 at 10:59 pm

    I do use carrots when I make the putanesca sauce. I also roast a Vidalia with the tomatoes and garlic to put in the food processor. Nice balance to tomato acid.

    I imagine the speed limit is imaginary between Santa Fe and Tem-pee.

    Manziel pissed away 7 for the Ackies, and threw a TD for Bama. Pretty funny, I thought. How do refs let him get away with “straight arms” that, purely and simply should be face mask penalty calls against the obnoxious little shit. And it may not have been worth the penalty, but I laughed my butt off when TJ Yeldon mocked Manziel with that money gesture. Manziel does it after every TD with impunity from the officials, so why does Yeldon get called? I’d like to see Murray, Marshall and Gurley vs. either defense. 700 yds. and slaughter rule points. Those Ds were pitiful. Manziel’s INT in the endzone was pitiful stupidity, and his attempted tackle on the pick-6 was laughable. Gary Danielson is always bad, but he was worse on this game about rooting for one side vs. the other than he usually is.

  13. MichaelG said on September 15, 2013 at 2:03 am

    Next time try simmering a boneless pork butt (really a shoulder) in cherry coke for hours. My Ex would do that. The first time I couldn’t believe it when she added a couple of jugs of cherry coke to the shopping list but the results were amazing. Try it and you’ll thank me.

  14. JWfromNJ said on September 15, 2013 at 8:50 am

    I recently changed the way I make a Marinara sauce and the results have been incredible. As in people eat bowls of the sauce. I have been pureeing celery along with onions and garlic and the celery disappears into the sauce but kills the acidity. It’s not something my mom or grandma would have done but it works.

    Try this:

    puree one medium onion, I like Vidalia, about five cloves of garlic, and four celery stalks. Saute that with olive oil, and not the extra virgin kind. Add a dash of salt, black pepper, and crushed red peppers, then hit it with a can of tomato paste. Then go with pureed Italian tomatoes, and I think it out with tomato juice.

    I also have a meatball tip from a south jersey Italian friend – again something I’d never do if I stayed old school. He mixes in ricotta cheese and it makes them light and fluffy, absolutely perfect.I’d say about 6 ounces for three pounds of meat. I use beef and ground turkey.

  15. LAMary said on September 15, 2013 at 8:52 am

    Made a big batch of basic tomato sauce last night and 40 meatballs. Most of it went into the fridge or freezer for work night meals. I never heard of putting carrots in puttanesca. It’s a fairly quick sauce and to me it’s the earthy stinkiness that is appealing. I would think carrots would mitigate that. We had an amatriciana sauce on cavatappi the other night that was excellent.

  16. basset said on September 15, 2013 at 11:44 am

    About to make pickles this morning, got half a bushel at the farmers’ market yesterday and along with the ones we’ve already done these should hold us through the winter.

    Some venison backstrap is soaking in apple cider in the fridge right now, that’ll get wrapped in bacon and grilled for dinner, and it’ll be potato-tipping day once I get done with the pickles; we tried growing taters in a barrel this year, you start with a little dirt in the bottom and keep adding more as the tops grow, and this afternoon we will dump the barrel out and see what grew.

  17. Suzanne said on September 15, 2013 at 2:02 pm

    We’ve had plenty of tomatoes in our garden, but I had to hold myself back from buying a box of cherry tomatoes yesterday at the Farmer’s Market. They were just soooo pretty! All sorts of sizes and colors!

  18. prospero said on September 15, 2013 at 2:49 pm

    I got the carrots in the putanesca from Mario Batali. That Italian grandmaw on PBS does it too.

  19. Deborah said on September 15, 2013 at 3:50 pm

    Little Bird and I are currently at Ojo Caliente, a natural hot mineral springs spa about an hour from Santa Fe, it’s very relaxing, there are individual pools with various minerals like iron, soda, arsenic (trace), lithia etc. A day pass allows you to wander around and soak to your hearts content. There’s also a steam room and a dry sauna for use with the day pass. They also offer massages, facials and all kinds of stuff like that. I just like the soaking and the sauna.

    After this we’ll drive past our land in Abiquiu to check out the rain situation there. It’s unbelievably beautiful drive from here to there.

  20. Jill said on September 15, 2013 at 7:30 pm

    My version of MichaelG’s pulled pork is to put the pork in a slow cooker, cover it in root beer and cook it all day (or night). I drain it, shred it and add sauce. Once it’s heated through it’s ready to go and delicious but not very sophisticated.

  21. Deborah said on September 15, 2013 at 8:04 pm

    I have the TV all ready for the next episode of Breaking Bad. I missed 3 episodes but got caught up this past week, can’t wait to see what happens next.

    Michael G, we’re going to try your cherry coke braising idea this week, we’re going to make sandwiches to take with us to Tempe.

  22. basset said on September 15, 2013 at 8:36 pm

    Deborah, ever taken the waters at French Lick/West Baden? “Pluto water,” they call it, sulphur springs with an old resort hotel nearby. My 40th high school reunion is there next month, not really sure I want to go though.

    Potatoes… in a 55-gallon barrel we got exactly five. Dunno what I did wrong but I’ll find out. Lots of pickles though.

  23. Deborah said on September 15, 2013 at 11:12 pm

    Basset, where are the waters at French Lick/West Baden?

  24. Basset said on September 16, 2013 at 6:38 am

    Southern Indiana, southeast of Bloomington…

    http://www.historichotels.org/hotels-resorts/french-lick-springs-hotel

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