In my Face.

If you’ve thrown a trout at me lately, or challenged me to match wits in the there/their/they’re test, or compared taste in books and movies, you’ve probably not heard back. I’m getting acquainted with the Ignore button on Facebook. I’m thinking of ignoring Facebook entirely. Don’t take it personally.

I’ve just about decided I’m too old to fully understand the Face (as the kids are calling it), and for once, that’s not a bad thing. I’d rather read a book; pity the soul who’d choose to spend that time on Facebook. Before I joined, I asked people why I needed to, and they all boiled down to “because you can keep in touch with all your friends.” Well, I can keep in touch with them now, and I don’t have to give up my privacy. I was finally convinced by a fellow journalist, who said he used the Face to get a full news cycle jump on the competition for a breaking story. I’m all for that, sure. But once I joined, then I had to learn to use it. The next thing I knew I was adding applications, lobbing Wall posts back and forth and otherwise wasting time. Just what the internet needs: Another way to waste time.

Lately the apps writers have been more aggressive. Someone challenges you to a trivia test, you take it, and to get your results, you have to pass a page inviting your friends to take it, too. I generally unselect everybody and pass it by, but lately they’ve been requiring me to pick a minimum number. Screw that. So: Ignore. Ignore, ignore, ignore. (Like all resolutions, I have problems keeping this one. Added a friend this morning.)

If anyone knows a secret about the Face that I’m missing, I’m interested.

Linkishness:

Via Eric Zorn: A great This American Life piece on the Jerry Springer you don’t know. Even if you think you did know him — and many Ohioans do — there’s almost guaranteed to be something here you don’t. A wonderful listen. Click on “full episode” and listen in QT.

I missed this in yesterday’s Freep — an amazing tale of bureaucratic heavy-handedness, or why you should keep up with what the kids are drinking these days. Detroit authorities snatch a UM professor’s 7-year-old away to foster care because the kid was seen drinking a Mike’s Lemonade at a Tigers game. The father said he didn’t know it was alcoholic (and I believe him).

Short shrift today, but deal — it’s 34 degrees outside and I have work to do.

Posted at 9:11 am in Media, Popculch, Uncategorized |
 

49 responses to “In my Face.”

  1. BOSSY said on April 29, 2008 at 9:14 am

    Face. Book. Even the name leaves something to be desired.

  2. velvet goldmine said on April 29, 2008 at 9:24 am

    It’s disturbing to me that some of my relationships seem to be slotted into — and formed in the mold of — the technology we use to communicate. I write to one friend via a private message board nearly every day. Fine. But she’s also a rabid Myspace user, and really wants me to be her “friend” in that capacity as well, which just isn’t my thing.

    A former co-worker hates email and the phone, and finds he can really only loosen up via instant messaging.

    In turn, I feel fairly comfortable with texts — it’s a fun challenge to avoid the vapid emoticons and acronyms in favor of pithy zingers. But when I sent my oldest friend a couple of playful messages, she expressed concern about the “slew” of texts, and made it clear that she didn’t participate in the grubbier side of modern times.

  3. Randy said on April 29, 2008 at 9:46 am

    One of my colleagues at work has done some research of Facebook. He found that people 30 and over might open a Facebook account and try it out for a few weeks, but they are quite likely to give up on it at some point.

    I have to admit I looked around a bit to see if anyone was there from high school and further back. Then I realized I don’t keep in touch with these people anymore because lives go off in different directions. It seems artificial to try and reconnect through Facebook, so I haven’t been back.

  4. brian stouder said on April 29, 2008 at 9:48 am

    I always feel like an intruder on the rare occasions that I have visited (or peeped into!) places like MySpace or Face or whatever-the-hell.

    It always strikes me as akin to rummaging through someone’s underwear drawer….and it is not reassuring that the person is beckoning you to do this!

  5. alex said on April 29, 2008 at 9:51 am

    A Mike’s Hard Lemonade put a 7-year-old into foster care? Please. You couldn’t catch a buzz if you knocked down ten of those wussy things.

    A friend who’s a nurse just told me a horrible newborn story. Two days old and near death from poisoning. Turns out the mother was doing meth and the chemicals were passing right through her skin into the baby’s skin when she handled it.

  6. John c said on April 29, 2008 at 9:55 am

    There are a number of internet things that remind me of the CB radio craze in the 70s, when old ladies would sit at home talking on their CBs. Facebook is one of them, though I’m not quite as down on it yet. I joined after some former newspaper folk in Chicago nudged me into it. I immediately felt like a loser when it barked at me: John Carpenter has no friends. Now I have a few, NN.c included.
    As for the Ann Arbor dad, it reminded me of an awkward moment I had a few years ago at the Park. I was with a buddy of mine and our kids. The older boys were talking amongst themselves, and my pal was holding his then-three-year old. My friend is a good guy and a good dad. But he’s old school and the son of a tavern-owner. He let his kid take a small sip of his beer. I noticed it and didn’t say anything. But he let him take a few more. They were small sips, but still. Then he let him take another one, and I remember thinking: Someone is going to call the cops. Thankfully, it stopped. But it was definitely one of those, “Um, should I say something?” moments.

  7. whitebeard said on April 29, 2008 at 10:05 am

    I mostly use Facebook to look at my family members’ diaries of what they are doing and what new nieces are arriving (as babies) or posting once they leave the crawling stage. And I have a few friends as well that I keep in touch with. Total number for both categories equals 15 but I do enjoy FaceBook for the photo sharing and photo commenting. I also enjoy posting photos on deviantart.com (no, not those kinds of photos!) because of the wide selection of photos on my favorite subjects: railroads and automobiles.

  8. Terry WAlter said on April 29, 2008 at 10:27 am

    The lemonade story is just another example of why we need less government,not more. Lots of things they do start out sounding good,but they never know when to quit. Like drunk driving. Nobody wants to get plowed by someone who is plowed. Buuut next thing you know,you are driving down the road minding your own business when you are lassoed into one of their checkpoints. WHAT’S THE PROBABLE CAUSE? Oh, we’ve had an above average number of arrests or accidents here. SO WHAT’S THAT GOT TO DO WITH ME? The constitution is based on individual rights, not nebulous numbers tortured by some government entity. At least it used to be.

  9. Sue said on April 29, 2008 at 10:28 am

    I wish that several of my relatives would just get email. Then I could talk to them without the required 45 minutes of nonsense that goes with it. I don’t know anything about facebook – other than I hope my daughter’s future employers are not able to check out her page. And speaking of my daughter, since she is a social work major I pray every day that she doesn’t decide to go into the child-protective branch of the profession. The people in that field are truly damned if they do and damned if they don’t. What got me about the article was not what happened – that kind of stuff is not that uncommon – but the comments afterward. Not a good cross-section of Michigan residents, I hope. And Alex… if I had 10 of anything alcoholic, well, I would be asleep after five. Or three. Or in a couple of cases, two. Super wuss, that’s me.

  10. Dorothy said on April 29, 2008 at 10:31 am

    I too connect with family members, whitebeard, via Facebook. My nieces & nephews and my two adult children use it, so it’s sort of fun to be “in the know” a little bit when conversing with them. And my brother Joe was thrilled that I found his son, who is teaching English in Germany. Joe’s ex did her damndest to keep their 3 kids out of his life, but thanks to Facebook, he and his son are communicating again.

    But I rue the day my niece got me hooked on crack, err… I mean Scrabulous. It’s a habit I simply MUST break if I expect to get anything done in the evening! But I’m cast in a play now and have lines to learn, so maybe that’s going to help me in the disconnect with Scrabulous.

  11. whitebeard said on April 29, 2008 at 10:44 am

    When I moved to the USA in 1981, I went to one staff party and had some drinks, mostly wine I think, and did not like the carefree (not careless, just carefree) driving I did. Because I drive a lot, I decided no more drinking and driving even though I had been told in Canada that I was a happy drinker. OK, i have had two or three drinks since then, two at parties out of state where there would be no need to drive anywhere and one drink in 1999 when the Supreme Court of Canada handed us an incredible decision that gave us custody of our U.S.-born grandson after flaming headlines against us across Canada.

  12. Danny said on April 29, 2008 at 11:04 am

    This here, NN.c, is about the only “social networking” I do. I don’t even do email very much. I prefer the phone.

    But, oh, I did just think of this. We do video (webcam) calls with my sis-in-law and nephews. It is pretty cool. We got to open presents with them virtually over Christmas and they even took their laptop to a family get-together and we got to chat with everyone.

    We actually stayed connected for several hours during that video call and we had guests at our own house too. People could peer into the computer and see what was going on at the opposite party location and talk at will like, “Hey, what are you making there in the kitchen? Looks good!”

  13. whitebeard said on April 29, 2008 at 11:09 am

    I just checked my family name on Facebook and I see my grandson has more friends than I have, 25, to be exact, mostly young girls that seem to cotton to him.

  14. brian stouder said on April 29, 2008 at 11:28 am

    Speaking of social networking, I think we (the mild-mannered inhabitants of NN.c-land) should put our collective heads together, and cheat…err, develop a winning entry for Laura Lippman’s little contest:

    1. Imagine that you are the child of an irascible classics professor who has an emphatic preference for the names of Greek gods over Roman ones.

    2. Furthermore imagine that your dad is so cracked that he insists on calling Earth “Gaia.”

    3. And keep in mind that, among the original names, one does hark back to Greek mythology.

    4. Now create your own mnemonic device for memorizing this transposed solar system. (Dang, I feel like Will Shortz.) I won’t promise to use the best one, by my very subjective standards, in the book-in-progress, but there will be a prize for the one I like best — a free unabridged audio version of ANOTHER THING TO FALL. And, yes, I’m well aware that I haven’t supplied the Greek names. Do a little homework, y’all.

  15. Sue said on April 29, 2008 at 11:43 am

    Whitebeard, I’d like to hear your story. Are you blogging somewhere? Or can you email me? Nancy can give you my email address if you want.

  16. whitebeard said on April 29, 2008 at 11:57 am

    Sue, I am slowly working on a blog, but have not put that incredibly wonderful decision on it yet. I will rely on Nancy to give me your e-mail address and I can give you links to some of the news stories and some added comments.
    As the Chinese curse proclaims “May you lead an interesting life” and I think this qualifies as “interesting” and a little frightening at times.

  17. beb said on April 29, 2008 at 1:07 pm

    My wife pointed out the Hard Lemonaide story to me yesterday when I got home from work. The idea of taking away someone’s child for a couple days over what was clearly a mistake is just frightening. You might wonder when the father didn’t question paying $7 for lemonaide but it was at a sports arena where prices have always been outrageous. But surely someone could have short circuited the whole process but taking the responsibility to say “no.”

    Mind you, I think there’s something a bit dangerous about marketing alcoholic beverages flavored to taste like soda pop. Liquor ought to taste unpleasant. But that’s just me.

    But getting back to child protective services, I am of mixed mind about the cult that was raided in Texas and all those kids being taken away from their mothers. I don’t hold with child brides, or polygamy and cults in general but I’m not sure that seperating children from their mothers in this situation isn’t as bad, isn’t as evil as what the authorities were saying about the cult.

  18. susang said on April 29, 2008 at 1:24 pm

    I’ve had this creepy feeling that Face Book was really just a Mary Kay makeup party.

    Then I thought, maybe it’s the first sign that you’re getting old.

  19. Crabby said on April 29, 2008 at 1:29 pm

    Beb – I went to a baseball game last week, beer was $7, bottle of water was $6, hard to tell much from the prices.

  20. Sue said on April 29, 2008 at 1:30 pm

    Except for the issue with half of the female children being or having been pregnant, I might agree with you, beb. My limited reading on this group indicates that mothers were not encouraged to get close to any of the children, so mother love might not be a factor. The boys would have been thrown out eventually, according to what I’ve read, and the girls apparently were married off early to men who basically owned them. I’m more worried about authorities not acclimating them gently enough into our world – the children have no defenses, such as education, to help them understand anything other than what they’ve been cocooned with. And religious indoctrination has probably made them very, very frightened of us.

  21. Hattie said on April 29, 2008 at 2:34 pm

    Those Facebook pages just look like a big mess to me.

  22. MommyTime said on April 29, 2008 at 2:54 pm

    I got a Facebook page initially so that I could share family photos with a friend I made through blogging who doesn’t post photos on her site. I felt like a den mother at a girl scout meeting, though, when I couldn’t be bothered to figure out all the applications and worried over the etiquette of it all: do I throw a sheep back to reciprocate? or is that like rejecting a gift? Also, the idea that I was going to “poke” someone freaked me out, since back in my day that was sexual slang…

    I still have the page, but I only check it when gmail tells me someone left me a martini or something. I have plenty of other ways to waste time. 🙂

  23. Dexter said on April 29, 2008 at 2:55 pm

    No Facebook for me, or MySpace , either. My grandkids use both but I spend my time on political and recovery blogs and boards. It’s nice to be able to choose,although trolls ruin every political blog, in time, unless an aggressive admin sorts trolls out and bans them.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    I had a friend who gave his kid sips of beer at our softball games thirty years ago…and when I was a salesman a customer in Celina, Ohio told me “all these Germans here in Mercer county give their kids beer with meals and nobody ever has a problem with it.” Great, unless the kid is a budding alkie.
    I was told Jewish people have no alcoholics in their circles because they are taught to use wine respectfully, at an early age.
    I never doubted that until I became a member of Alcoholics Anonymous.
    Alcoholism affects all groups, German-American farm kids as well as Jewish folks.

  24. moe99 said on April 29, 2008 at 3:59 pm

    In this story: http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/24009286/
    a woman who escaped from another branch of this same sect describes how children are conditioned, starting in infancy, to not fight back against the total control exerted over members of the sect.

    This in particular struck me, hard. In fact, I’m feeling a bit ill:

    Everything you did was monitored and controlled and everybody reported on everyone else,” she said. “It was a police state. You were not allowed to make decisions in your life. I had no power over my life or the lives of my children. It was a terrible way to live.”

    The alleged control began in infancy.

    “The method he would use with infants was a form of water torture,” Jessop said of her former husband. “He would spank the baby until it was screaming out of control, and then he would hold the baby faceup under a tap of running water so it couldn’t breathe. He would do this repeatedly. Sometimes, it would go on for an hour, until the baby was so exhausted it couldn’t cry anymore. This method he called ‘breaking them.’”

    Did I miss something here, or is she describing waterboarding babies?

  25. moe99 said on April 29, 2008 at 4:01 pm

    I may be repeating myself here, but as my first comment appears not to be posted:

    In this story: http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/24009286/
    a woman who escaped from another branch of this same sect describes how children are conditioned, starting in infancy, to not fight back against the total control exerted over members of the sect.

    This in particular struck me, hard. In fact, I’m feeling a bit ill:

    Everything you did was monitored and controlled and everybody reported on everyone else,” she said. “It was a police state. You were not allowed to make decisions in your life. I had no power over my life or the lives of my children. It was a terrible way to live.”

    The alleged control began in infancy.

    “The method he would use with infants was a form of water torture,” Jessop said of her former husband. “He would spank the baby until it was screaming out of control, and then he would hold the baby faceup under a tap of running water so it couldn’t breathe. He would do this repeatedly. Sometimes, it would go on for an hour, until the baby was so exhausted it couldn’t cry anymore. This method he called ‘breaking them.’”

    Did I miss something here, or is she describing waterboarding babies?

  26. Mike Harvey said on April 29, 2008 at 4:36 pm

    Facebook can be useful when setting up events. You can get a quick count on who and who isn’t avalable. Don’t sign up for any aps. Fb is much better than MySpace.

  27. Catherine said on April 29, 2008 at 5:22 pm

    Anyone have an opinion on LinkedIn?

  28. kayak woman said on April 29, 2008 at 6:05 pm

    A young friend of mine recently took her 4-year-old with her on a short errand to a smalltown business. When they got there, he did not want to get out of the car. She was able to park directly in front of the business such that she could see him in the car and went in to do her business, which took a matter of minutes. He was locked in and the weather was temperate. When she returned to her car, a cop arrested her for child negligence (or whatever, can’t exactly remember the crime).

    A court battle ensued with the usual fees to lawyers and whatnot. At the courthouse, the cop who arrested her approached her in the lobby to APOLOGIZE! He told her that if he’d had any idea of the amount of trouble this would cause her, he wouldn’t have arrested her.

    Life is hard and it is harder when you are a mom with little kids and very little help. Twenty-some years ago, I would’ve done the same thing. In fact, I’m not sure how I would have been able to buy gas back in those days without leaving the kids in the car. I would not have been arrested. When did the rules change?

  29. joodyb said on April 29, 2008 at 6:40 pm

    the only reason for anyone over 30 to be on FB is to monitor the wanton behaviors of their progeny. even then, it’s admittedly creepy. i have reconnected with some folks, though!
    kayak woman, that story makes the hairs stand up on the back of my neck! as if life is not difficult enough. he shoulda just skipped the apology too. what an idiot.

  30. moe99 said on April 29, 2008 at 6:41 pm

    Nancy,
    I hope that tomorrow you can give us the low down skinny on the text messages that were just released involving the mayor and his lady love……

  31. joodyb said on April 29, 2008 at 6:49 pm

    Catherine: i’m not sure if they’ve tightened things on LinkedIn, but when it started up, i received email solicitations from erstwhile colleagues i would not necessarily have wanted others (especially w/i my industry) to think i was associated with. back then, once you responded to someone, you were sucked down the rabbithole. IT types advised against it. lots may have changed in 7-8 years.

  32. Jolene said on April 29, 2008 at 7:10 pm

    I got a Facebook account because my young nephew invited me to be his friend when he joined. He now has dozens of friends, but, at first, I think he was looking for numbers, even if they included boring old aunts. I look at it about once a month, and occasionally I see that one of my 10 or so friends has added some new photos, which is fun. Otherwise, I can’t say having the account has had a great effect on my life. It doesn’t seem to offer exciting new possibilities for communication, but, perhaps, I’m just not being imaginative enough because, heaven knows, I’m always interested in exciting new possibilities.

  33. Suzi said on April 29, 2008 at 7:14 pm

    I don’t have time or make time for Facebook or other such entertainments, but I do try to make time to read print stuff still, think the kids are reading the Wall Street Journal or LA
    Times?

    There was a pretty good piece on the Mormon kids on Talk of the Nation yesterday:
     http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=90006302

    Kids from Polygamous Sect Remain in State Custody

    Talk of the Nation, April 28, 2008 · More than 400 children remain in the care of the state after reports of child sexual abuse prompted a raid on a Texas polygamist compound. Authorities maintain that they are protecting the kids, but families argue there was no evidence of abuse. Guests and callers weigh in on what’s best for the children.

    I believe boys have been driven out of that community already, so there’s the other aspect of child abuse that’s not being talked about as much as the child rape scenario.

  34. Deborah said on April 29, 2008 at 9:30 pm

    I’ve got a Facebook account. I don’t even remember how it came to be. Mostly it’s people from work that are my friends, no, make that exclusively people from work. I hardly ever interact with it. It’s just boring.

    I’m with you Beb about the cult in Texas, I don’t condone any of it but it seems a bit extreme that they’d wrench all those kids out of the only life they’ve ever known…

    The first commenter on this thread, Bossy. Is that the real Bossy from the excellent road trip I’ve been reading so much about? Wow.

    Commenting on blogs is an interesting phenomenom to me. I spent ages and ages lurking on my favorites, then I commented once or twice, then it began to feel like a community that I might in some small, small way have a voice in. Has anyone ever done any research about how this paradigm shift happens?

  35. Jolene said on April 29, 2008 at 9:38 pm

    I don’t know about studies of blog-commenters, Deborah, but there are numerous studies of communication in online communities. Here’s a list of references, including at least one book, to the work of Nancy Baym, who is a pretty well-known researcher in this field. Of course, there are many other researchers as well. To see other references, just take Baym’s name out of the search box. Or you could check out this article, which is especially fascinating.

  36. Jolene said on April 29, 2008 at 10:20 pm

    Whoops, I got that Nancy Baym link wrong. This one works.

  37. brian stouder said on April 29, 2008 at 11:06 pm

    Jolene – that WAS an especially fascinating monograph! And; although I may indeed be ‘alone’ on this project (Jolene will get the joke), here is my first hack at coming up with a transposed solar system ‘mnemonic device’ (sounds like an Oija board!)

    First, here’s the homwork part; the Greek names (near as I can tell) for the planets, starting from the sun and working outward are:

    Mercury – Hermes

    Venus – Aphrodite

    Earth – Gaea

    Mars – Ares

    Jupiter – Zeus

    Saturn – Cronus

    Uranus – Ouranos

    Neptune – Poseidon

    Pluto – Hades

    So our mnemonic device has to utilize H A G A Z C O P H.

    hmmmmmmmm…..

    Hillary And Gore Agreed – Zero Clinton-Obama Party Hopes

    Happy Anglers Get All Zealous Concerning Owens Pupfish Habitat

    Half Assed Geeks Attracting Zany Chicks Often Puzzles Humanity

    (the damned Z is a killer!)

  38. moe99 said on April 30, 2008 at 1:10 am

    In this story: http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/24009286/ a woman who escaped from another branch of this same sect describes how children are conditioned, starting in infancy, to not fight back against the total control exerted over members of the sect.

    This in particular struck me, hard. In fact, I’m feeling a bit ill:

    Everything you did was monitored and controlled and everybody reported on everyone else,” she said. “It was a police state. You were not allowed to make decisions in your life. I had no power over my life or the lives of my children. It was a terrible way to live.”

    The alleged control began in infancy.

    “The method he would use with infants was a form of water torture,” Jessop said of her former husband. “He would spank the baby until it was screaming out of control, and then he would hold the baby faceup under a tap of running water so it couldn’t breathe. He would do this repeatedly. Sometimes, it would go on for an hour, until the baby was so exhausted it couldn’t cry anymore. This method he called ‘breaking them.’”

    Did I miss something here, or is she describing waterboarding babies?

  39. moe99 said on April 30, 2008 at 1:13 am

    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/24009286

    I’ve tried to post this story about members of a related FLDS
    sect several times, but I guess I’m not a trusted user. Hopefully this can get posted because I think the information is important.

  40. Dexter said on April 30, 2008 at 3:13 am

    kayak woman: A friend in Kansas City had the same experience, but with her dog. It was hot and she left the car running with A/C on full blast as she ran into the store for a one-item , three minute shopping experience. That’s all it took…a woman saw the dog, flagged down a passing patrol car, and the cop was ready to take some kind of action when my friend emerged from the store and told her story. However, all she received was a stern lecture on how this cop had seen a car smash into a storefront when an exited pooch had jumped on the transmission selector and engaged DRIVE.

  41. Sue said on April 30, 2008 at 8:53 am

    The sentencing happened this month:
    “A woman from eastern Wisconsin whose minivan caught fire, killing two of six children inside is sentenced to six days in jail.

    A Kewaunee County judge also sentenced 36-year-old Susan Laluzerne of Luxembourg to a year of probation. She was charged with providing day care services without a license.

    State law prohibits anyone from providing care for four or more unrelated children under the age of seven without a license. Police say she left the children unattended in the minivan last November while she went into a store for about five minutes.

    The fire killed a two-year-old and a nine-month-old child.”

    That’s all they got her for – child care without a license.

  42. Dorothy said on April 30, 2008 at 9:42 am

    Moe that story almost made me feel faint, I swear. I wish like mad they could shut down those freaks and get rid of those kinds of sects.

  43. nancy said on April 30, 2008 at 9:50 am

    Yep, that’s waterboarding, all right.

  44. Jolene said on April 30, 2008 at 10:09 am

    Brian:

    Here are some partial solutions to your mnemonic problem. I leave it to you and anyone else who might find it entertaining to try to finish them.

    Heck, All Guys Attempt Zone Coverage Of . . .

    Hooray! A Guy Almost Zeros Competitors Of . . .

    How A Gay Artist Zapped Critics Of . . .

    How A Giant Adder Zapped . . .

    How A Girl Ate Zesty Cheese On . . .

  45. Jolene said on April 30, 2008 at 10:19 am

    Re the FLDS sect, I’m sure you’ve heard the latest news re how 60% of the 14-17 girls were currently or had been pregnant. Also amazing, a CNN reporter said this AM that, among the children taken from the ranch, the number of boys and girls was about equal up to the age of 14. After that age, there were many more boys than girls. I wonder what happens to the 14-year-old boys who get chased out.

  46. brian stouder said on April 30, 2008 at 11:58 am

    So using Jolene’s starts –

    Heck, All Guys Attempt Zone Coverage Of Pretty Honeys
    (works better than Harlots or Hussy’s or Ho’s…..or Hoosiers)

    Hooray! A Guy Almost Zeros Critics Of Pink Houses

    How A Gay Artist Zapped Critics Of Paul Harvey

    How A Giant Adder Zapped Cleopatra’s Older Personal Hairdresser (these two are my favorites)

    How A Girl Ate Zesty Cheese On Pumpernickel Hoagys

  47. joodyb said on April 30, 2008 at 7:30 pm

    Jolene: In “Big Love,” they go off and start their own commitments. or become rogue prophets. then there is the inevitable rutting with the patriarch.
    the thing i loved about that series is that you were shown the underlying subversive power the women actually possessed in the culture.

  48. Anthony Juliano said on May 1, 2008 at 6:32 pm

    Yeah, but if you ignored Facebook, I bet you’d miss all of this stuff:

    http://www.adgabber.com/video/video/show?id=546804%3AVideo%3A94292

  49. Marcia said on May 9, 2008 at 7:13 pm

    Okay, who are all these people?

    Anyway. Take Facebook for what you will, Nance. You don’t have to be its slave. I check mine when I feel like it.

    I can never close my account, anyway, because I would lose the glass slipper Ashley Morris sent me not so long ago, with the caption “ta-da!”

    I asked him what the point was, and he said he didn’t know; he was just glad he figured out how to send gifts.